North Carolina Botanical Garden
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Nature Studies

 

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Month
Date
Upcoming Event
May
5/13/2021
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Virtual Lunchbox Talk: How Trees Can Save the World - And What We Can Do To Help
What are some of our most pressing environmental issues? How can trees can solve these issues? Most importantly, what can we do to help? Spoiler alert: it's properly planting new trees and responsibly caring for the ones we have. How do we properly plant new trees? How can we care for existing trees in a manner that maximizes positive benefits for all members of our ecosystem? We'll teach you how to do these things, as well as how to avoid common pitfalls.
5/15/2021
9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Vegetative Propagation of Southeastern Native Plants
Event is Full: Accepting Wait List Registrations
Learn the fundamentals of vegetative propagation and how to propagate plants native to the southeastern United States. We’ll focus on low-tech methods you can apply at home, and all participants will have a newly stuck cutting to take home in a rudimentary, DIY mobile greenhouse. This workshop will feature a lecture, in-class demonstrations and participation, and a tour of the NCBG nursery.
5/15/2021
10:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Blue Wild Indigo at Penny's Bend
Event is Full: Accepting Wait List Registrations
This hike will provide a wonderful opportunity to see rare flora at Penny’s Bend Nature Preserve, owned by the Army Corps of Engineers, and managed by the North Carolina Botanical Garden. Baptisia aberrans is an imperiled species at the state level and survives in only a small number of remnant Piedmont prairie or savanna patches. The Garden’s management practices at Penny’s Bend has favored a variety of prairie and savanna flora. About 2 miles in length, much of this hike is on primitive trails over uneven terrain, with one short, steep climb up from the river. Wear sturdy hiking footwear and bring insect repellent, water, and a walking stick, if you ever use one.
5/15/2021
2:00 PM to 4:00 PM
Taking iNaturalist to the Next Level: Virtual
You’ve already created an iNaturalist account and shared some observations. Are you eager to take your use of iNaturalist to the next level? If so, please join us for an exploration of iNaturalist's advanced features that can enhance your use of the app and the website, as well as your participation in the iNaturalist community. Whether your goal is to hone, organize, and curate your own species observations, to engage with or create an iNaturalist Project, or to more actively participate in identifying your own and others’ observations, knowledge of (and tips for using) key iNaturalist features will help. We’ll also share strategies for exploring iNaturalist’s wealth of species data and maps, and for connecting with helpful and knowledgeable members of iNaturalist’s worldwide community of users.
5/16/2021
1:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Native Southeastern Medicinal Plants
Event is Full: Accepting Wait List Registrations
Explore the beauty of native southeastern medicinal plants through field identification. Using the expansive resources of the NCBG display gardens and the Piedmont Nature Trails behind the Garden, students take in the abundant medicine that our local flora has to offer. Topics include field identification, ethical gathering and harvesting, history and lore of each plant, therapeutic and medicinal uses as well as preparations. No prerequisites.
5/19/2021
10:00 AM to 6/2/2021 12:30 PM
Local Trees
Event is Full: Accepting Wait List Registrations
This short course is perfect for those just beginning their study of trees or for recent transplants to the NC Piedmont who want to identify the common deciduous trees in their backyard gardens and neighborhoods. Students spend time outdoors, walking in the Garden or on the Piedmont Nature Trails, learning about common trees, how to identify them, and understanding why they grow where they do.
5/27/2021
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Virtual Lunchbox Talk: Monitoring and Management at the Green Swamp Preserve
Monitoring studies are essential for the management and preservation of select species, but also for restoration and management on a broader community scale. The Nature Conservancy has supported long-term studies on longleaf pine restoration, the endangered species Lysimachia asperulifolia, and Venus flytrap in the Green Swamp and other preserves. The studies are particularly important for determining the success of restoration efforts but also in quantifying impacts of seasonal controlled burns.
5/27/2021 2:00 PM
Local Trees
Event is Full: Accepting Wait List Registrations
This short course is perfect for those just beginning their study of trees or for recent transplants to the NC Piedmont who want to identify the common deciduous trees in their backyard gardens and neighborhoods. Students spend time outdoors, walking in the Garden or on the Piedmont Nature Trails, learning about common trees, how to identify them, and understanding why they grow where they do.
June
6/1/2021
3:30 PM to 6/15/2021 5:00 PM
Principles of Conservation Biology: Hybrid
Event is Full: Accepting Wait List Registrations
This course is intended for an experienced audience and introduces the principles of biodiversity and conservation. Students learn about rare plants, conservation genetics, ecological restoration, conservation landscaping, and preserve design.
6/2/2021 2:00 PM
Local Trees
Event is Full: Accepting Wait List Registrations
This short course is perfect for those just beginning their study of trees or for recent transplants to the NC Piedmont who want to identify the common deciduous trees in their backyard gardens and neighborhoods. Students spend time outdoors, walking in the Garden or on the Piedmont Nature Trails, learning about common trees, how to identify them, and understanding why they grow where they do.
6/5/2021
9:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Vegetative Propagation of Southeastern Native Plants
Event is Full: Accepting Wait List Registrations
Learn the fundamentals of vegetative propagation and how to propagate plants native to the southeastern United States. We’ll focus on low-tech methods you can apply at home, and all participants will have a newly stuck cutting to take home in a rudimentary, DIY mobile greenhouse. This workshop will feature a lecture, in-class demonstrations and participation, and a tour of the NCBG nursery.
6/10/2021
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Virtual Lunchbox Talk: Pawpaws and Other Native Tree Fruits for your Garden
Interest in native tree fruits is growing as people are exploring permaculture, homesteading and a renewed attentiveness to food self-sufficiency. Native fruits have less pest problems and are well-suited to the growing conditions of their bioregion. Mary Jac Brennan will talk about pawpaws, American persimmons, chinquapins, and more in time to prepare your site for fall/winter planting.
6/12/2021
9:30 AM to 6/26/2021 12:30 PM
Entomology
Event is Full: Accepting Wait List Registrations
This course is designed for a broad audience. Students learn insect family recognition and common species identification, insect ecology and conservation, basic life cycle biology, and how to improve insect habitat and conservation in the urban environment.
6/22/2021
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Sustainable Solutions to Your Landscape Challenges: Virtual
Are the trees in your garden maturing, resulting in a change in the level of light (sun to shade) in your garden? Or does your garden have existing mature trees, creating challenges for planting without damaging the roots? If so, this class is for you.
6/24/2021
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Virtual Lunchbox Talk: The Search for Anti-Cancer Phytochemicals in Lumbee Herbal Medicine
The North Carolina Native American Ethnobotany Project was a 2-year research investigation of cultural and medicinal plants of significance to Indigenous communities in North Carolina. This lecture highlights several plants with a long history of medicinal use within these communities to fight infections and examines the scientific evidence to support their use by local communities.
September
9/9/2021
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Virtual Lunchbox Talk: History and Heritage of the Coker House and Gardens
William C. Coker came to Chapel Hill in 1903 as the first Professor of Botany. Over the first half of the 20th century, Professor Coker, as a botanist, planner and landscape designer, shaped the UNC campus and the Chapel Hill community. He is responsible for the design and creation of the Arboretum, named in his honor. His home and surrounding garden offer insight into this remarkable man and his wife, Louisa Venable Coker, and the enduring influence they had on this community. In 1985, Dr. Woodrow Burns, Jr. and his late wife, Mary Jane, purchased the Coker property from the university and oversaw the restoration of the home and garden.